SECRETARIAL ORDER # 3206

Subject: American Indian Tribal Rights, Federal-Tribal Trust Responsibilities, and the Endangered Species Act

Sec. 1. Purpose and Authority. This Order is issued by the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of Commerce (Secretaries) pursuant to the Endangered Species Act of 1973, 16 U.S.C. 1531, as amended (the Act), the federal-tribal trust relationship, and other federal law. Specifically, this Order clarifies the responsibilities of the component agencies, bureaus and offices of the Department of the Interior and the Department of Commerce (Departments), when actions taken under authority of the Act and associated implementing regulations affect, or may affect, Indian lands, tribal trust resources, or the exercise of American Indian tribal rights, as defined in this Order. This Order further acknowledges the trust responsibility and treaty obligations of the United States toward Indian tribes and tribal members and its government-to-government relationship in dealing with tribes. Accordingly, the Departments will carry out their responsibilities under the Act in a manner that harmonizes the Federal trust responsibility to tribes, tribal sovereignty, and statutory missions of the Departments, and that strives to ensure that Indian tribes do not bear a disproportionate burden for the conservation of listed species, so as to avoid or minimize the potential for conflict and confrontation.

Sec. 2. Scope and Limitations. (A) This Order is for guidance within the Departments only and is adopted pursuant to, and is consistent with, existing law.

(B) This Order shall not be construed to grant, expand, create, or diminish any legally enforceable rights, benefits or trust responsibilities, substantive or procedural, not otherwise granted or created under existing law. Nor shall this Order be construed to alter, amend, repeal, interpret or modify tribal sovereignty, any treaty rights, or other rights of any Indian tribe, or to preempt, modify or limit the exercise of any such rights.

(C) This Order does not preempt or modify the Departments' statutory authorities or the authorities of Indian tribes or the states.

(D) Nothing in this Order shall be applied to authorize direct (directed) take of listed species, or any activity that would jeopardize the continued existence of any listed species or destroy or adversely modify designated critical habitat. Incidental take issues under this Order are addressed in Principle 3(C) of Section 5.

(E) Nothing in this Order shall require additional procedural requirements for substantially completed Departmental actions, activities, or policy initiatives.

(F) Implementation of this Order shall be subject to the availability of resources and the requirements of the Anti-Deficiency Act.

(G) Should any tribe(s) and the Department(s) agree that greater efficiency in the implementation of this Order can be achieved, nothing in this Order shall prevent them from implementing strategies to do so.

(H) This Order shall not be construed to supersede, amend, or otherwise modify or affect the implementation of, existing agreements or understandings with the Departments or their agencies, bureaus, or offices including, but not limited to, memoranda of understanding, memoranda of agreement, or statements of relationship, unless mutually agreed by the signatory parties.

Sec. 3. Definitions. For the purposes of this Order, except as otherwise expressly provided, the following terms shall apply:

(A) The term "Indian tribe" shall mean any Indian tribe, band, nation, pueblo, community or other organized group within the United States which the Secretary of the Interior has identified on the most current list of tribes maintained by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

(B) The term "tribal trust resources" means those natural resources, either on or off Indian lands, retained by, or reserved by or for Indian tribes through treaties, statutes, judicial decisions, and executive orders, which are protected by a fiduciary obligation on the part of the United States.

(C) The term "tribal rights" means those rights legally accruing to a tribe or tribes by virtue of inherent sovereign authority, unextinguished aboriginal title, treaty, statute, judicial decisions, executive order or agreement, and which give rise to legally enforceable remedies.

(D) The term "Indian lands" means any lands title to which is either: 1) held in trust by the United States for the benefit of any Indian tribe or individual; or 2) held by any Indian tribe or individual subject to restrictions by the United States against alienation.

Sec. 4. Background. The unique and distinctive political relationship between the United States and Indian tribes is defined by treaties, statutes, executive orders, judicial decisions, and agreements, and differentiates tribes from other entities that deal with, or are affected by, the federal government. This relationship has given rise to a special federal trust responsibility, involving the legal responsibilities and obligations of the United States toward Indian tribes and the application of fiduciary standards of due care with respect to Indian lands, tribal trust resources, and the exercise of tribal rights.

The Departments recognize the importance of tribal self-governance and the protocols of a government-to-government relationship with Indian tribes. Long-standing Congressional and Administrative policies promote tribal self-government, self-sufficiency, and self-determination, recognizing and endorsing the fundamental rights of tribes to set their own priorities and make decisions affecting their resources and distinctive ways of life. The Departments recognize and respect, and shall consider, the value that tribal traditional knowledge provides to tribal and federal land management decision-making and tribal resource management activities. The Departments recognize that Indian tribes are governmental sovereigns; inherent in this sovereign authority is the power to make and enforce laws, administer justice, manage and control Indian lands, exercise tribal rights and protect tribal trust resources. The Departments shall be sensitive to the fact that Indian cultures, religions, and spirituality often involve ceremonial and medicinal uses of plants, animals, and specific geographic places.

Indian lands are not federal public lands or part of the public domain, and are not subject to federal public land laws. They were retained by tribes or were set aside for tribal use pursuant to treaties, statutes, judicial decisions, executive orders or agreements. These lands are managed by Indian tribes in accordance with tribal goals and objectives, within the framework of applicable laws.

Because of the unique government-to-government relationship between Indian tribes and the United States, the Departments and affected Indian tribes need to establish and maintain effective working relationships and mutual partnerships to promote the conservation of sensitive species (including candidate, proposed and listed species) and the health of ecosystems upon which they depend. Such relationships should focus on cooperative assistance, consultation, the sharing of information, and the creation of government-to-government partnerships to promote healthy ecosystems.

In facilitating a government-to-government relationship, the Departments may work with intertribal organizations, to the extent such organizations are authorized by their member tribes to carry out resource management responsibilities.

Sec. 5. Responsibilities. To achieve the objectives of this Order, the heads of all agencies, bureaus and offices within the Department of the Interior, and the Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) within the Department of Commerce, shall be responsible for ensuring that the following directives are followed:

Principle 1. THE DEPARTMENTS SHALL WORK DIRECTLY WITH INDIAN TRIBES ON A GOVERNMENT-TO-GOVERNMENT BASIS TO PROMOTE HEALTHY ECOSYSTEMS.

The Departments shall recognize the unique and distinctive political and constitutionally based relationship that exists between the United States and each Indian tribe, and shall view tribal governments as sovereign entities with authority and responsibility for the health and welfare of ecosystems on Indian lands. The Departments recognize that Indian tribes are governmental sovereigns with inherent powers to make and enforce laws, administer justice, and manage and control their natural resources. Accordingly, the Departments shall seek to establish effective government-to-government working relationships with tribes to achieve the common goal of promoting and protecting the health of these ecosystems. Whenever the agencies, bureaus, and offices of the Departments are aware that their actions planned under the Act may impact tribal trust resources, the exercise of tribal rights, or Indian lands, they shall consult with, and seek the participation of, the affected Indian tribes to the maximum extent practicable. This shall include providing affected tribes adequate opportunities to participate in data collection, consensus seeking, and associated processes. To facilitate the government-to-government relationship, the Departments may coordinate their discussions with a representative from an intertribal organization, if so designated by the affected tribe(s).

Except when determined necessary for investigative or prosecutorial law enforcement activities, or when otherwise provided in a federal-tribal agreement, the Departments, to the maximum extent practicable, shall obtain permission from tribes before knowingly entering Indian reservations and tribally-owned fee lands for purposes of ESA-related activities, and shall communicate as necessary with the appropriate tribal officials. If a tribe believes this section has been violated, such tribe may file a complaint with the appropriate Secretary, who shall promptly investigate and respond to the tribe.

Principle 2. THE DEPARTMENTS SHALL RECOGNIZE THAT INDIAN LANDS ARE NOT SUBJECT TO THE SAME CONTROLS AS FEDERAL PUBLIC LANDS.

The Departments recognize that Indian lands, whether held in trust by the United States for the use and benefit of Indians or owned exclusively by an Indian tribe, are not subject to the controls or restrictions set forth in federal public land laws. Indian lands are not federal public lands or part of the public domain, but are rather retained by tribes or set aside for tribal use pursuant to treaties, statutes, court orders, executive orders, judicial decisions, or agreements. Accordingly, Indian tribes manage Indian lands in accordance with tribal goals and objectives, within the framework of applicable laws.

Principle 3. THE DEPARTMENTS SHALL ASSIST INDIAN TRIBES IN DEVELOPING AND EXPANDING TRIBAL PROGRAMS SO THAT HEALTHY ECOSYSTEMS ARE PROMOTED AND CONSERVATION RESTRICTIONS ARE UNNECESSARY.

(A) The Departments shall take affirmative steps to assist Indian tribes in developing and expanding tribal programs that promote healthy ecosystems. The Departments shall take affirmative steps to achieve the common goals of promoting healthy ecosystems, Indian self-government, and productive government-to-government relationships under this Order, by assisting Indian tribes in developing and expanding tribal programs that promote the health of ecosystems upon which sensitive species (including candidate, proposed and listed species) depend.

The Departments shall offer and provide such scientific and technical assistance and information as may be available for the development of tribal conservation and management plans to promote the maintenance, restoration, enhancement and health of the ecosystems upon which sensitive species (including candidate, proposed, and listed species) depend, including the cooperative identification of appropriate management measures to address concerns for such species and their habitats.

(B) The Departments shall recognize that Indian tribes are appropriate governmental entities to manage their lands and tribal trust resources. The Departments acknowledge that Indian tribes value, and exercise responsibilities for, management of Indian lands and tribal trust resources. In keeping with the federal policy of promoting tribal self-government, the Departments shall respect the exercise of tribal sovereignty over the management of Indian lands, and tribal trust resources. Accordingly, the Departments shall give deference to tribal conservation and management plans for tribal trust resources that: (a) govern activities on Indian lands, including, for the purposes of this section, tribally-owned fee lands, and (b) address the conservation needs of listed species. The Departments shall conduct government-to-government consultations to discuss the extent to which tribal resource management plans for tribal trust resources outside Indian lands can be incorporated into actions to address the conservation needs of listed species.

(C) The Departments, as trustees, shall support tribal measures that preclude the need for conservation restrictions.

At the earliest indication that the need for federal conservation restrictions is being considered for any species, the Departments, acting in their trustee capacities, shall promptly notify all potentially affected tribes, and provide such technical, financial, or other assistance as may be appropriate, thereby assisting Indian tribes in identifying and implementing tribal conservation and other measures necessary to protect such species.

In the event that the Departments determine that conservation restrictions are necessary in order to protect listed species, the Departments, in keeping with the trust responsibility and government-to-government relationships, shall consult with affected tribes and provide written notice to them of the intended restriction as far in advance as practicable. If the proposed conservation restriction is directed at a tribal activity that could raise the potential issue of direct (directed) take under the Act, then meaningful government-to-government consultation shall occur, in order to strive to harmonize the federal trust responsibility to tribes, tribal sovereignty and the statutory missions of the Departments. In cases involving an activity that could raise the potential issue of an incidental take under the Act, such notice shall include an analysis and determination that all of the following conservation standards have been met: (i) the restriction is reasonable and necessary for conservation of the species at issue; (ii) the conservation purpose of the restriction cannot be achieved by reasonable regulation of non-Indian activities; (iii) the measure is the least restrictive alternative available to achieve the required conservation purpose; (iv) the restriction does not discriminate against Indian activities, either as stated or applied; and, (v) voluntary tribal measures are not adequate to achieve the necessary conservation purpose.

Principle 4. THE DEPARTMENTS SHALL BE SENSITIVE TO INDIAN CULTURE, RELIGION AND SPIRITUALITY.

The Departments shall take into consideration the impacts of their actions and policies under the Act on Indian use of listed species for cultural and religious purposes. The Departments shall avoid or minimize, to the extent practicable, adverse effects upon the noncommercial use of listed sacred plants and animals in medicinal treatments and in the expression of cultural and religious beliefs by Indian tribes. When appropriate, the Departments may issue guidelines to accommodate Indian access to, and traditional uses of, listed species, and to address unique circumstances that may exist when administering the Act.

Principle 5. THE DEPARTMENTS SHALL MAKE AVAILABLE TO INDIAN TRIBES INFORMATION RELATED TO TRIBAL TRUST RESOURCES AND INDIAN LANDS, AND, TO FACILITATE THE MUTUAL EXCHANGE OF INFORMATION, SHALL STRIVE TO PROTECT SENSITIVE TRIBAL INFORMATION FROM DISCLOSURE.

To further tribal self-government and the promotion of healthy ecosystems, the Departments recognize the critical need for Indian tribes to possess complete and accurate information related to Indian lands and tribal trust resources. To the extent consistent with the provisions of the Privacy Act, the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and the Departments' abilities to continue to assert FOIA exemptions with regard to FOIA requests, the Departments shall make available to an Indian tribe all information held by the Departments which is related to its Indian lands and tribal trust resources. In the course of the mutual exchange of information, the Departments shall protect, to the maximum extent practicable, tribal information which has been disclosed to or collected by the Departments. The Departments shall promptly notify and, when appropriate, consult with affected tribes regarding all requests for tribal information relating to the administration of the Act.

Sec. 6. Federal-Tribal Intergovernmental Agreements. The Departments shall, when appropriate and at the request of an Indian tribe, pursue intergovernmental agreements to formalize arrangements involving sensitive species (including candidate, proposed, and listed species) such as, but not limited to, land and resource management, multi-jurisdictional partnerships, cooperative law enforcement, and guidelines to accommodate Indian access to, and traditional uses of, natural products. Such agreements shall strive to establish partnerships that harmonize the Departments' missions under the Act with the Indian tribe's own ecosystem management objectives.

Sec. 7. Alaska. The Departments recognize that section 10(e) of the Act governs the taking of listed species by Alaska Natives for subsistence purposes and that there is a need to study the implementation of the Act as applied to Alaska tribes and natives. Accordingly, this Order shall not apply to Alaska and the Departments shall, within one year of the date of this Order, develop recommendations to the Secretaries to supplement or modify this Order and its Appendix, so as to guide the administration of the Act in Alaska. These recommendations shall be developed with the full cooperation and participation of Alaska tribes and natives. The purpose of these recommendations shall be to harmonize the government-to-government relationship with Alaska tribes, the federal trust responsibility to Alaska tribes and Alaska Natives, the rights of Alaska Natives, and the statutory missions of the Departments.

Sec. 8. Special Study on Cultural and Religious Use of Natural Products. The Departments recognize that there remain tribal concerns regarding the access to, and uses of, eagle feathers, animal parts, and other natural products for Indian cultural and religious purposes. Therefore, the Departments shall work together with Indian tribes to develop recommendations to the Secretaries within one year to revise or establish uniform administrative procedures to govern the possession, distribution, and transportation of such natural products that are under federal jurisdiction or control.

Sec. 9. Dispute Resolution. (A) Federal-tribal disputes regarding implementation of this Order shall be addressed through government-to-government discourse. Such discourse is to be respectful of government-to-government relationships and relevant federal-tribal agreements, treaties, judicial decisions, and policies pertaining to Indian tribes. Alternative dispute resolution processes may be employed as necessary to resolve disputes on technical or policy issues within statutory time frames; provided that such alternative dispute resolution processes are not intended to apply in the context of investigative or prosecutorial law enforcement activities.

(B) Questions and concerns on matters relating to the use or possession of listed plants or listed animal parts used for religious or cultural purposes shall be referred to the appropriate Departmental officials and the appropriate tribal contacts for religious and cultural affairs.

Sec. 10. Implementation. This Order shall be implemented by all agencies, bureaus, and offices of the Departments, as applicable. In addition, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service shall implement their specific responsibilities under the Act in accordance with the guidance contained in the attached Appendix.

Sec. 11. Effective Date. This Order, issued within the Department of the Interior as Order No. 3206, is effective immediately and will remain in effect until amended, superseded, or revoked.

This Secretarial Order, entitled "American Indian Tribal Rights, Federal-Tribal Trust Responsibilities, and the Endangered Species Act," and its accompanying Appendix were issued this 5th day of June, 1997, in Washington, D.C., by the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of Commerce.

_____________________________			_____________________________
Secretary of the Interior Secretary of Commerce

Date: June 5, 1997


APPENDIX

Appendix to Secretarial Order issued within the Department of the Interior as Order No. 3206

Sec. 1. Purpose. The purpose of this Appendix is to provide policy to the National, regional and field offices of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), (hereinafter "Services"), concerning the implementation of the Secretarial Order issued by the Department of the Interior and the Department of Commerce, entitled "American Indian Tribal Rights, Federal-Tribal Trust Responsibilities, and the Endangered Species Act." This policy furthers the objectives of the FWS Native American Policy (June 28, 1994), and the American Indian and Alaska Native Policy of the Department of Commerce (March 30, 1995). This Appendix shall be considered an integral part of the above Secretarial Order, and all sections of the Order shall apply in their entirety to this Appendix.

Sec. 2. General Policy. (A) Goals. The goals of this Appendix are to provide a basis for administration of the Act in a manner that (1) recognizes common federal-tribal goals of conserving sensitive species (including candidate, proposed, and listed species) and the ecosystems upon which they depend, Indian self-government, and productive government-to-government relationships; and (2) harmonizes the federal trust responsibility to tribes, tribal sovereignty, and the statutory missions of the Departments, so as to avoid or minimize the potential for conflict and confrontation.

(B) Government-to-Government Communication. It shall be the responsibility of each Service's regional and field offices to maintain a current list of tribal contact persons within each Region, and to ensure that meaningful government-to-government communication occurs regarding actions to be taken under the Act.

(C) Agency Coordination. The Services have the lead roles and responsibilities in administering the Act, while the Services and other federal agencies share responsibilities for honoring Indian treaties and other sources of tribal rights. The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) has the primary responsibility for carrying out the federal responsibility to administer tribal trust property and represent tribal interests during formal Section 7 consultations under the Act. Accordingly, the Services shall consult, as appropriate, with each other, affected Indian tribes, the BIA, the Office of the Solicitor (Interior), the Office of American Indian Trust (Interior), and the NOAA Office of General Counsel in determining how the fiduciary responsibility of the federal government to Indian tribes may best be realized.

(D) Technical Assistance. In their roles as trustees, the Services shall offer and provide technical assistance and information for the development of tribal conservation and management plans to promote the maintenance, restoration, and enhancement of the ecosystems on which sensitive species (including candidate, proposed, and listed species) depend. The Services should be creative in working with the tribes to accomplish these objectives. Such technical assistance may include the cooperative identification of appropriate management measures to address concerns for sensitive species (including candidate, proposed and listed species) and their habitats. Such cooperation may include intergovernmental agreements to enable Indian tribes to more fully participate in conservation programs under the Act. Moreover, the Services may enter into conservation easements with tribal governments and enlist tribal participation in incentive programs.

(E) Tribal Conservation Measures. The Services shall, upon the request of an Indian tribe or the BIA, cooperatively review and assess tribal conservation measures for sensitive species (including candidate, proposed and listed species) which may be included in tribal resource management plans. The Services will communicate to the tribal government their desired conservation goals and objectives, as well as any technical advice or suggestions for the modification of the plan to enhance its benefits for the conservation of sensitive species (including candidate, proposed and listed species). In keeping with the Services' initiatives to promote voluntary conservation partnerships for listed species and the ecosystems upon which they depend, the Services shall consult on a government-to-government basis with the affected tribe to determine and provide appropriate assurances that would otherwise be provided to a non-Indian.

Sec. 3. The Federal Trust Responsibility and the Administration of the Act.

The Services shall coordinate with affected Indian tribes in order to fulfill the Services' trust responsibilities and encourage meaningful tribal participation in the following programs under the Act, and shall:

(A) Candidate Conservation.

(1) Solicit and utilize the expertise of affected Indian tribes in evaluating which animal and plant species should be included on the list of candidate species, including conducting population status inventories and geographical distribution surveys;

(2) Solicit and utilize the expertise of affected Indian tribes when designing and implementing candidate conservation actions to remove or alleviate threats so that the species' listing priority is reduced or listing as endangered or threatened is rendered unnecessary; and

(3) Provide technical advice and information to support tribal efforts and facilitate voluntary tribal participation in implementation measures to conserve candidate species on Indian lands.

(B) The Listing Process.

(1) Provide affected Indian tribes with timely notification of the receipt of petitions to list species, the listing of which could affect the exercise of tribal rights or the use of tribal trust resources. In addition, the Services shall solicit and utilize the expertise of affected Indian tribes in responding to listing petitions that may affect tribal trust resources or the exercise of tribal rights.

(2) Recognize the right of Indian tribes to participate fully in the listing process by providing timely notification to, soliciting information and comments from, and utilizing the expertise of, Indian tribes whose exercise of tribal rights or tribal trust resources could be affected by a particular listing. This process shall apply to proposed and final rules to: (i) list species as endangered or threatened; (ii) designate critical habitat; (iii) reclassify a species from endangered to threatened (or vice versa); (iv) remove a species from the list; and (v) designate experimental populations.

(3) Recognize the contribution to be made by affected Indian tribes, throughout the process and prior to finalization and close of the public comment period, in the review of proposals to designate critical habitat and evaluate economic impacts of such proposals with implications for tribal trust resources or the exercise of tribal rights. The Services shall notify affected Indian tribes and the BIA, and solicit information on, but not limited to, tribal cultural values, reserved hunting, fishing, gathering, and other Indian rights or tribal economic development, for use in: (i) the preparation of economic analyses involving impacts on tribal communities; and (ii) the preparation of "balancing tests" to determine appropriate exclusions from critical habitat and in the review of comments or petitions concerning critical habitat that may adversely affect the rights or resources of Indian tribes.

(4) In keeping with the trust responsibility, shall consult with the affected Indian tribe(s) when considering the designation of critical habitat in an area that may impact tribal trust resources, tribally-owned fee lands, or the exercise of tribal rights. Critical habitat shall not be designated in such areas unless it is determined essential to conserve a listed species. In designating critical habitat, the Services shall evaluate and document the extent to which the conservation needs of the listed species can be achieved by limiting the designation to other lands.

(5) When exercising regulatory authority for threatened species under section 4(d) of the Act, avoid or minimize effects on tribal management or economic development, or the exercise of reserved Indian fishing, hunting, gathering, or other rights, to the maximum extent allowed by law.

(6) Having first provided the affected Indian tribe(s) the opportunity to actively review and comment on proposed listing actions, provide affected Indian tribe(s) with a written explanation whenever a final decision on any of the following activities conflicts with comments provided by an affected Indian tribe: (i) list a species as endangered or threatened; (ii) designate critical habitat; (iii) reclassify a species from endangered to threatened (or vice versa); (iv) remove a species from the list; or (v) designate experimental populations. If an affected Indian tribe petitions for rulemaking under Section 4(b)(3), the Services will consult with and provide a written explanation to the affected tribe if they fail to adopt the requested regulation.

(C) ESA Section 7 Consultation.

(1) Facilitate the Services' use of the best available scientific and commercial data by soliciting information, traditional knowledge, and comments from, and utilizing the expertise of, affected Indian tribes in addition to data provided by the action agency during the consultation process. The Services shall provide timely notification to affected tribes as soon as the Services are aware that a proposed federal agency action subject to formal consultation may affect tribal rights or tribal trust resources.

(2) Provide copies of applicable final biological opinions to affected tribes to the maximum extent permissible by law.

(3)(a) When the Services enter formal consultation on an action proposed by the BIA, the Services shall consider and treat affected tribes as license or permit applicants entitled to full participation in the consultation process. This shall include, but is not limited to, invitations to meetings between the Services and the BIA, opportunities to provide pertinent scientific data and to review data in the administrative record, and to review biological assessments and draft biological opinions. In keeping with the trust responsibility, tribal conservation and management plans for tribal trust resources that govern activities on Indian lands, including for purposes of this paragraph, tribally-owned fee lands, shall serve as the basis for developing any reasonable and prudent alternatives, to the extent practicable.

(b) When the Services enter into formal consultations with an Interior Department agency other than the BIA, or an agency of the Department of Commerce, on a proposed action which may affect tribal rights or tribal trust resources, the Services shall notify the affected Indian tribe(s) and provide for the participation of the BIA in the consultation process.

(c) When the Services enter into formal consultations with agencies not in the Departments of the Interior or Commerce, on a proposed action which may affect tribal rights or tribal trust resources, the Services shall notify the affected Indian tribe(s) and encourage the action agency to invite the affected tribe(s) and the BIA to participate in the consultation process.

(d) In developing reasonable and prudent alternatives, the Services shall give full consideration to all comments and information received from any affected tribe, and shall strive to ensure that any alternative selected does not discriminate against such tribe(s). The Services shall make a written determination describing (i) how the selected alternative is consistent with their trust responsibilities, and (ii) the extent to which tribal conservation and management plans for affected tribal trust resources can be incorporated into any such alternative.

(D) Habitat Conservation Planning.

(1) Facilitate the Services' use of the best available scientific and commercial data by soliciting information, traditional knowledge, and comments from, and utilizing the expertise of, affected tribal governments in habitat conservation planning that may affect tribal trust resources or the exercise of tribal rights. The Services shall facilitate tribal participation by providing timely notification as soon as the Services are aware that a draft Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) may affect such resources or the exercise of such rights.

(2) Encourage HCP applicants to recognize the benefits of working cooperatively with affected Indian tribes and advocate for tribal participation in the development of HCPs. In those instances where permit applicants choose not to invite affected tribes to participate in those negotiations, the Services shall consult with the affected tribes to evaluate the effects of the proposed HCP on tribal trust resources and will provide the information resulting from such consultation to the HCP applicant prior to the submission of the draft HCP for public comment. After consultation with the tribes and the non-federal landowner and after careful consideration of the tribe's concerns, the Services must clearly state the rationale for the recommended final decision and explain how the decision relates to the Services' trust responsibility.

(3) Advocate the incorporation of measures into HCPs that will restore or enhance tribal trust resources. The Services shall advocate for HCP provisions that eliminate or minimize the diminishment of tribal trust resources. The Services shall be cognizant of the impacts of measures incorporated into HCPs on tribal trust resources and the tribal ability to utilize such resources.

(4) Advocate and encourage early participation by affected tribal governments in the development of region-wide or state-wide habitat conservation planning efforts and in the development of any related implementation documents.

(E) Recovery.

(1) Solicit and utilize the expertise of affected Indian tribes by having tribal representation, as appropriate, on Recovery Teams when the species occurs on Indian lands (including tribally-owned fee lands), affects tribal trust resources, or affects the exercise of tribal rights.

(2) In recognition of tribal rights, cooperate with affected tribes to develop and implement Recovery Plans in a manner that minimizes the social, cultural and economic impacts on tribal communities, consistent with the timely recovery of listed species. The Services shall be cognizant of tribal desires to attain population levels and conditions that are sufficient to support the meaningful exercise of reserved rights and the protection of tribal management or development prerogatives for Indian resources.

(3) Invite affected Indian tribes, or their designated representatives, to participate in the Recovery Plan implementation process through the development of a participation plan and through tribally-designated membership on recovery teams. The Services shall work cooperatively with affected Indian tribes to identify and implement the most effective measures to speed the recovery process.

(4) Solicit and utilize the expertise of affected Indian tribes in the design of monitoring programs for listed species and for species which have been removed from the list of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants occurring on Indian lands or affecting the exercise of tribal rights or tribal trust resources.

(F) Law Enforcement.

(1) At the request of an Indian tribe, enter into cooperative law enforcement agreements as integral components of tribal, federal, and state efforts to conserve species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. Such agreements may include the delegation of enforcement authority under the Act, within limitations, to full-time tribal conservation law enforcement officers.

(2) Cooperate with Indian tribes in enforcement of the Act by identifying opportunities for joint enforcement operations or investigations. Discuss new techniques and methods for the detection and apprehension of violators of the Act or tribal conservation laws, and exchange law enforcement information in general.